Bio

Way Back When

With a year’s worth of allowance I bought my first sewing machine when I was 11 years old. By the time I was thirteen I was creating my own fashions and wearing them a bit self consciously to Jr. High. One day the principal pulled me out of math class and explained that the black sun dress which I had trimmed with white lace was indecent. It broke the dress code because it was sleeveless. I argued that because the dress had wide straps I could still wear a bra with it and thus I wasn’t breaking the spirit of the code. Nevertheless my mom was called to bring me an alternative outfit. While waiting outside the school for my mom to arrive the principal followed me out and began again about the dress code. I felt threatened, vulnerable and angry. I told him to “go to hell.”

When I got home that night my parents made me call all of my girlfriends and tell them through a flood of tears that the big slumber party I had planned for the weekend was canceled because of my mouthing off. I’ve been sewing with attitude ever since!

Then

As a young adult I began making quilts in 1989 and selling them at the local farmers’ market in Carrboro, NC. I loved to sew and I loved fabric. I had a great eye for color and patterns. I thought it would be a good way to make extra money. I sold my first quilt the second week out. Within a year I saw the first exhibition of African-American improvisational quilts, Who’d A Thought It, a show organized by Eli Leon at the Ackland Art Museum at UNC-Chapel Hill. It changed the course of my life. I began improvising with patchwork, which led to my professional career as an artist.  I remember selling my first improv piece for $1500 at the farmers’ market it was similar to the quilt below but square and in primary colors. I couldn’t sleep that night I was so excited– my voice and vision was recognized, appreciated, valued. I was hooked.

Crosses by Sherri Lynn Wood, 1992
 Crosses by Sherri Lynn Wood, 1992

Now

I’m living and working in Oakland, CA as an artist, quilt maker, teacher and author. In 2016 I’m looking forward to being an Artist-In-Residence at Recology, San Francisco, from June-August, working on my second book, and visiting/teaching with Austin MQG, Oakland – Eastbay Heritage Quilters, QuiltCon West in Pasadena, Bainbridge Island MQG, Glamp Stitch-alot, the Greater Ann Arbor Quilt Guild, and for the South Bay Area MQG in Santa Cruz! Please see my event schedule for details and links.

Bio

SHERRI LYNN WOOD is an artist working in Oakland, CA. She is the recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant for Painters and Sculptors, and a two-time MacDowell Colony Fellow. She has been making and improvising quilts as a creative life practice for twenty-five years, and blogs about it at daintytime.net. Teaching credits include Penland School of Craft, QuiltCon, and numerous modern and traditional guilds across the country. In 2016, she will be an artist in residence at Recology, the San Francisco dump, where she will begin work on her second book. Her first book, The Improv Handbook For Modern Quilters – A Guide to Creating, Quilting and Living Courageously, released by STC Craft/Abrams in April 2015 has sold more than 10,000 copies.